CONNECTING WITH CONSUMERS

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Friday, August 23 2013

How to Make Money Before You Are 30


If Mike Nichols were to remake The Graduate, there would need to be a crucial script change.  Newly graduated Benjamin Braddock would not be informed that his future lay in 'plastics,' but social media.  "Ben, I've got one word for you, Internet.'

Thanks to staff.com' Reina Carpeso for this.






Salaries for Popular Online Jobs - Infographic
Staff.com – Connecting Great Companies with Global Talent

Friday, October 12 2012

Consumers as Social Media

The marketing software firm Marketo brings us this social media users profile segmentation, which likely will prove too close to home for comfort.  Yes, it's a sorry state of affairs when people become their machines, but hey, isn't that exactly what Raymond Kurzweil predicts in The Singularity is Near?  It's sad to see so many people becoming slaves to their portable devices and social media channels, but that's the reality of the contemporary world.  Are you ready to admit, which type of social media addict are you?

socialaddictsIG.jpg

Friday, January 27 2012

Talkin' About My Generation

Every consumer is part of one, like it or not, and from the consumer's perspective, it's the best.  From my perspective as an ancient baby boomer, the music was better, films were better, politics more engaging, and I got to write my doctoral dissertation on a typewriter.  Okay, I'll give millennials the edge in technology.

This infographic from onlinegraduateprograms comes thanks once again from my no. 1 source of infographics, Peter Kim.





Millennials
Created by: Online Graduate Programs

Saturday, November 5 2011

Generation Mobile

A nice followup to my last post pertaining to smartphones, this HackCollege.com infographic comes to me by way of Peter Kim, and offers some perspective on the role of the portable phone in the lives of contemporary American students.  Granted, the sample is small: 200 respondents randomly sampled from several universities nationwide, and somewhat skewed in favor of females (approx. 60-70%). 

By their nature, infographics provide a rather superficial glimpse of current trends and behaviors, so take this for what it's worth.  Needless to say, while we might quibble with the numbers, for many youth, take away their phones and you take away part of their selves.




Generation Mobile
Created by: HackCollege

Sunday, October 9 2011

Infographic: Never Leave Home Again

Paris is an amazing city, I don't deny that, and I am sure that by living here, I am the envy of millions of people living in lesser cities, towns, or villages.  That said, Paris shares a major drawback that one can find in any alternative burg - people!  Here we are in the 21st century, with technology evolving at a mindboggling pace, enhancing our lives in untold ways, and yet many people seem to be stuck in the Stone Age - grunting in response to a simple request, blowing smoke in your face, bumping into you on the sidewalk as if you are invisible, resting their filthy trainers on metro seats, spitting and urinating in public, and in many cities, like the one in the US where I grew up, shooting, stabbing, maiming, punching, drowning, and whatnot, just for the hell of it.  What to do, yes, what to do?  Perhaps the obvious answer to how to cope with the caveperson formerly known as 'human' is just in front of our noses:  stay home!

According to a recent infographic, among several offered up by Peter Kim, who claims to have taken a fancy to this site, the computer and the Internet have made the 'never leave home again' coping mechanism increasingly possible.  You be the judge.

I personally think there is something to be said for leaving the home from time to time.  One reason is to chase after my cat, who is not yet 'connected.'  Another is to go to work, which I still can't completely do from home, although it probably won't be too long before most teaching is done via a computer screen - I've already exploited that possibility with some video teaching I did for TEC students sitting in a Monterrey, Mexico classroom.  Another is to actually meet up with people you like - that is, the non-cavemen types - in actual bricks and mortar settings, to converse around drinks, catch a live band, visit an art gallery, attend a baseball game, and my personal favorite, to have an original meal in a restaurant (without which my Paris Restaurants and Beyond blog would be lame indeed).  Not that these activities can't be accomplished virtually (although I'm a bit stuck figuring out how to accomplish the restaurant feat in virtual life), but from my perspective, something is clearly lost in translation.  What's scarier than not having to leave home at all are all those device obsessed persons in the real world who psychologically are nowhere except in their devices.  Watching many young Parisians walking around town while frantically texting, checking their messages, talking on the phone, etc. - don't tell me they are in Paris.  They are in the device, which for many, might as well be home.




Created by: College At Home